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nor [[strikethrough]] even [[/strikethrough]] inquire about them and [[underline]] Celine [[/underline]] in her usual cheerful helping way, [[strikethrough]] said [[/strikethrough]] [[underline]] drove back and forward until every one had his trunk and felt happy. [[/underline]] Mrs. [[underline]] Ewing's son, of former Patent Commissioner Ewing [[/underline]] is also in aviation ready to leave and she was there also with her car.  While [[underline]] Celine [[/underline]] and the boys were all chatting together, they were suddenly called away to "fall in".  Squadron formed  attention and [[underline]] George and his friends made away, sending a last smile to his mother and he was gone. [[/underline]] Afterwards she learned from Mrs. Ewing that they had sailed on a [[underline]] british passenger ship [[/underline]] provisional destination probably England.  Next day I got short note of

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him, on letter head of [[underline]] White Star line, Date etc. torn out by censor, [[/underline]] that he was aboard of a passenger steamer, few passengers, others all cadets and officers, and had a first class cabin all to himself.  This is rather reassuring.  I though they would send him on a transport ship.
Oct. 30.  A heap of belated letters.  [[underline]] More bad news about Italian army. Germans [[/underline]] claim 100000 prisoners.  
Oct. 31.  at home dictating letters.  Rossi here tonight for supper to discuss matters of General [[underline]] Bakelite Co. [[/underline]].  Tells me [[underline]] Fritz Roessler [[/underline]], son of Roessler of R & H Co. is in the army as private and his parents put him [[underline]] out the house because he volunteered in American Army.  R & H have not subscribed a cent to Liberty loan while General Bakelite Co. has subscribed [[/underline]]
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