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fied. Excellent wines. At about 2:30 P.M dinner was over. House is situated in beautiful garden and is an old house [[strikethrough]] Was [[/strikethrough]] of dignified appearance Was [[underlined]] bombarded repeatedly [[/underlined]] by the [[underlined]] Germans, but repaired [[/underlined]] as fast as struck by their shells. One sees shell holes on almost every standing tree every building.
Then Mercier Jr, Blanquère and [[underlined]] Valette [[/underlined]] escorted us to visit their well designed [[underlined]] coke plant, [[/underlined]] all [[underlined]] automatically [[/underlined]] charged and discharged very [[underlined]] modern. [[/underlined]] Not only recovering tar but gas as well and using the latter for making [[underlined]] ethylalcohol [[/underlined]] ^[[and ether]] from ethylene-synthetic ammonia, (Haber-Rossignol process) from their Nitrogen and hydrogen. [[underlined]] Methylalcohol [[/underlined]] from [[strikethrough]] Ce [[/strikethrough]] the small amount of carbon mon-
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oxid + hydrogen. The whole system is housed in large [[strikethrough]] we [[/strikethrough]] spacious building filled with compressors and refrigerators Claude system. everything well designed and well run Must have cost much money besides good engineering. I notice they have a number of [[underlined]] Polish workmen [[/underlined]] as I see signs in Polish. 
They have also a large [[underlined]] electric power generating plant [[/underlined]] where they generate their steam power from pulverized poor coal which they could not sell or transport profitably They [[underlined]] furnish current [[/underlined]] and [[underlined]] power [[\underlined]] to the neighborhood They have a [[underlined]] railroad [[/underlined]] of [[underlined]] their own which connects [[/underlined]] with the "Chemin de Fer du Nord" system. To [[underlined]] sum up: [[/underlined]] La [[underlined]] Compagnie des Mines de [[/underlined]] Bethune is not merely an
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