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U.S.S. Houston

Mare Island, California
13 September, 1938.

Dear Dr. Schmitt,

Thank you for your note of 6 Seotember.  I am the one who should be embarrassedm not you, for I should have known that you intended to use your fine pictures for illustrations for an article.  You are eminently fitted to do the scientific end of the cruise and I hope that your article will appear in the Geographic.

My story is just about finished and will go forward for such censorship as Mr. Early or the Navy Department wich to give in a few days.  As you probably will surmise, I am writing the yarn from the human interest angle.  I have touched on your activities as extensively as I could from what I was able to find out about them here on board.  That aspect makes not attempt to be more than general from a layman's point of view.  I hope my scientific mistakes and sins are not too heinous.

I have collected a fine group of black and white photographs which I am sending on the Magazine.  They do like color, though, as you well know.  Perhaps, then, as has happened in the past, there will be two articles on the Cruise in the same issue.  I will look forward to reading yours with great interest.

Thanking you for your interest and with kindest personal regards to an old shipmate, I am

Sincerely,

^[[Arthur A. Ageton]]
Arthur A. Ageton

Dr. Waldo L. Schmitt,
United States National Museum, Washington, D.C..
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