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Miami Beach

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   Winter brings thoroughbred racing, starting about Dec. 1 and continuing until late April; dog racing is held most of the year; jai alai from December until April. Among winter feature events are the Orange Bowl football game, Orange Bowl regatta, flower shows, sailing races, major league baseball training games, golf and tennis tournaments.
   Summer starts May 1, when hotel and apartment rates drop to their yearly lows, where they remain until Nov. 1. This is the time of year for conventions, package vacation tours and more leisurely living. Summer visitors make full use of the city's golf courses, the fishing, sightseeing and other natural attractions. Honeymoon couples, in particular, have found the combination of luxury at low cost especially attractive, with the result that newlyweds form a substantial proportion of the visitors.
   Conventions, ranging from groups of less than 100 to 50,000 and more, also bring many people here for the first time. Surveys show convention delegates stay longer in Miami Beach than in any other city, partaking of the holiday life after business sessions are completed.
   Fishing deserves special mention, winter or summer, for it is one of the most popular diversions here. Fishing cruisers with a crew of two and tackle can be chartered for about $75 a day for Gulf Stream trolling, where the big game includes marlin, sailfish, wahoo and dolphin. These craft accommodate six persons and usually troll four lines. Half-days on drift fishing boats, with 25 to 50 persons aboard, can be bought for about $3.50.
   Tarpon are sought in the inlets and over the reefs on light or heavy tackle and are most numerous in March, April, May and June. Bonefish, snapper, permit and other light tackle species may be taken from small boats in the bays throughout the year. There also is fishing from seawalls and from the municipal pier at no cost.

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