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MUSEUM BUILDING

During the latter part of the fiscal year it has been necessary to close to the public the hall of American archeology on the second floor front, the reason being that installation of the Clarence B. Moore collection has been started. The exhibits of the entire hall will be changed and it is hoped by the end of July that this room may be opened to the public. 

Another important installation has taken place by the exhibiting of some of the results of the James B. Ford--Robert A. Bartlett exhibition in the Eskimo hall.

MUSEUM ANNEX

Due to the acquisition of numerous collections it has been found necessary during the past year to increase our shelving in the Annex. This has been done and the collections therein are now entirely in order.

The grounds have been well maintained and are in very good condition.

The two large totem poles recently obtained by the Museum will be erected on the Annex grounds the early part of this summer.

CHANGES IN STAFF

Mr. E. K. Burnett was appointed to the office staff in the capacity of purchasing agent and business manager, on January 1, 1931.

Mr. Gerard Ewell was appointed on the technical staff, February 16, 1931. 

Miss Ruth Gaines terminated her connection with the Museum on June 30, 1930, due to the transfer of the library to the Huntington Free Library and Reading Room, and on July 1, 1930 she became the librarian of the Huntington Free Library and Reading Room, which is the library department of the Museum.

Professor Schuller finished his work for the Museum, August 31, 1930. 

EXPEDITIONS

Arizona. Mr. John L. Nelson has continued his researches among the Hopi, collecting ceremonial objects and information for his forthcoming publication upon that tribe. 

Canada. Mr. Frederick Johnson conducted an ethnological trip to Nova Scotia and as a result the Museum has a large and comprehensive collection from the Micmac Indians. 

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Mr. A. Irving Hallowell during a trip in the Province of Manitoba made a collection of ethnology from the Swampy Cree of Cross Lake, Norway House, and Grand Rapids. 

East Greenland. Through a very generous donation made to the Museum by the late James B. Ford, Captain Robert A. Bartlett was enabled to make a visit to East Greenland returning with some very exceptional specimens from the living Eskimo of Angmagsalik, and also a most complete and unique collection from ancient Eskimo sites on Shannon and Clavering Islands. 

Labrador. Dr. Frank G. Speck continued his interesting investigations among the Naskapi, and added much needed material to our collections. 

Chile. Dr. S. K. Lothrop completed his expedition to Chile having made very satisfactory archeological and ethnological collections. Of notable interest is the fine collection of ethnology from the Mapuche Indians. This expedition was conducted through the generosity of Mrs. Thea Heye. 

Venezuela. Dr. Herbert Spencer Dickey made another unsuccessful attempt to reach the headwaters of the Orinoco. He succeeded, however, in making an interesting ethnological collection from the Piaroas Indians of Cataniapo River, the Maquiritaris Indians, and the Guaharibos Indians of the Upper Orinoco. 

COLLECTIONS PRESENTED

A most valuable collection of Mexican archeology was presented through the generosity of Mrs. Thea Heye. Much rare pottery from the State of Oaxaca, Mexico, including the largest funeral urn yet recorded, also unique stone carvings and metal work were in this donation.

A sacred ceremonial shield over a century old used by the Pawnee in their buffalo round-up was acquired through the generosity of Mr. Blair S. Williams. 

COLLECTIONS ACQUIRED

Among the noteworthy additions to the collections this year were two large totem poles from British Columbia, permission for the removal of which was most generously given by the Canadian Government. 

Another gap in our collections was filled by the purchase in London, England, of one of the excessively rare buffalo hide tipis. This one was originally purchased in Fort Garry (now Winnipeg) in 1861 from Assiniboin. 

The Altruve collection of ethnology from various tribes of Guatemala.

The Charles W. Hutchinson collection of ethnology from the Iroquois, Yankton Sioux, Apache and archeology from the State of New York. 

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Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.