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15891 Shannon Rd.,
Los Gatos Calif.
Dec. 17, 1976

Dear Mr. Lopez:-

Your letter of the 10th received. Thank you for your interest. My book, "I Taught Amelia to Fly" published by Vantage Press N.Y. gives a clear documented account of those early days of aviation in which I took part.

Never during the five years of my flying career was I given anything but respect and kindness on the part of the public and on the part of those with whom I associated. In the three flying schools that I attended, where I was the only girl, I was accepted as a "kid sister" and protected. I held up my end of the work involved and asked for no special consideration.

At the Curtiss School in Newport New Virginia, my work in the machine shop where I helped over haul OX5 engines was appreciated to the extent that Mr. Ballard ordered the instructors to give me extra flying time.

When in the employ of the British Air Ministry at the Willis-Overland plant in Elmira N.Y., the various department heads were kind and cooperative when I insisted at times that the British output had priorities. This was because the British fighter pilots were holding off the enemy while the U.S. was building an Air Corps.

Later during my "barnstorming" days in my rebuilt Canuck in the midwestern states, I was helped in many ways. If I landed in a farmers field out of gas or lost, he fed me, entertained me and haul the gas. Others always helped tie down the plane at night and helped service it. Town families invited me into their homes. Many expressed fear of flying and some that I was "daring" but all were respectful and kind. I have had letters from some of those barnstorming passenger since my book was published.
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