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112      THE CRISIS

Union, is a Negro, R. Nathaniel Dett. His carol "Listen to the Lambs" was sung at the University of Wisconsin Armory, December 11th. The Director says:

"Side by side with magnificent musical climaxes is the syncopated time, which is so popular with rag-time lovers. Almost instantly it changes from grand and majestic harmonies to some of those good old 'barber shop' minor chords, which a bunch of fellows likes to hold on to. Often when one voice is carrying a catchy Negro air, the rest of the voices are weaving a background of harmony around it which carries the production out of the realm of rag-time and into the realm of the classical."

"The Fruit of his Folly" a drama in five acts, was given at Wilberforce University, Ohio, under the direction of Miss Hallie Q. Brown.

David Mannes, the violinist, will give two hours' instruction each week to the three best students of the violin in the Music Settlement for Colored People in New York City. 

Willie H. Butler of Yonkers, New York, is one of the pupils who will study under Mr. Mannes.
 
A new musical organization known as "The Haywood Symphony Club" has been perfected in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

The French Government has purchased some paintings from Henry O. Tanner, for its collection of modern art in the Luxembourg Gallery. 

Mme. Lillian Hawkins Jones, a contralto of the Colorado Conservatory of Music, is giving concerts in Kentucky and the South. 

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ATHLETICS

Hampton Institute captured the Inter-Collegiate football title of the South Atlantic States by defeating all of its opponents in this vicinity. Union University, of Richmond, fell a victim by a score of 13 to 0, and Howard University felt the crush of a perfect machine on Thanksgiving Day when Hampton rolled up 18 points via the touchdown route and Howard scored nothing. 

Other important games were between Union and Petersburg which closed a 9 to 7 victory for Union, and Howard defeated Union by a 18 to 0 score.
 
Even with a knowledge of conditions existing, we venture to assert that until the seasonal games begin earlier, and fuller schedules are the rule, although smaller institutions are included, football will never be the sport it should be among colleges in this section. For some reason Lincoln University was not a factor and played none of the I.C.A.A teams.

The advent of two new coaches entering the field made for renewed interest in many circles. Walker Bacon, a graduate of M Street High School of Washington, D.C., and Syracuse University, took charge of the Petersburg team as faculty director of athletics and coach and all but defeated the school's big rival, Union. Merton P. Robinson, a well known football mentor, landed a Deanship at Union University in the Teacher's College and became faculty coach of athletics with a result that Union was able to throw a scare of considerable dimensions into the football camps of Howard and Hampton, a fact that will make Union be taken more seriously in coming seasons of sport if the system now employed obtains longer. 

The thrilling battle of the season was the Thanksgiving struggle at Hampton. Howard's line was incapable of preventing the charging forwards of Hampton from smearing formations before they were born, and the Hampton backfield with the ever present Cayle for much of the game romped over the Howard trenches for big gains. 

The four most prominent institutions in football in the South would be ranked this year as follows: Fisk first, More-house second, Talladega third, and Tuskegee fourth. The following are the scores: 

Fisk..........0  Morehouse ....0
Fisk..........47 Tuskegee .....0
Fisk..........9  Talladega.....3
Fisk..........0  Wilberforce...0
Fisk..........6  Tuskegee .....6

Morehouse-Talladega, declared "No Game."
Talladega...  6  Tuskegee .....6

The Morehouse-Talladega game was 



ALONG THE COLOR LINE    113

not played to conclusion as darkness left fifteen minutes to play. Each school had really kicked one field goal which would have made the score 3-3, but the game was officially called "No Game" by the umpire. Atlanta University has shown improvement in football, but was beaten by both Talladega and Tuskegee and lost to Morris Brown in her critical game on Thanksgiving Day 13 to 7.

In Washington on February 25th will be held one of the largest athletic carnivals held in the East at Convention Hall under the auspices of Howard University and the Public Schools Athletic League.

J.E. Tregg, a colored man, is a member of the Varsity crew at Syracuse University and also a member of the football team.

James Wiley fourteen years old, proved the best all around athlete at a field meet of the Pathfinders' on the State Fair grounds in Minnesota. James belongs to the Congo Club, which is the one colored club in the Pathfinders' camp.

M Street High School won the football championship of the secondary school teams of the South Atlantic Section. 

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SOCIAL UPLIFT

With simple ceremonies and the singing of Negro folk songs Booker T. Washington was buried at Tuskegee Institute. Many distinguished persons, white and black, were present. Memorial meetings for Mr. Washington have been held throughout the United States and in Canada. 

Mrs. Mary Church Terrell spoke at the Fifth Avenue Marble Collegiate Church, New York City, under the auspices of the Women's Board of Domestic Missions of the Reformed Church of America. 

Eugene K. Jones, Associate Director of the National League on Urban Conditions among Negroes, is making a tour of cities in the Middle West urging the value of the work of the League. 

The Virginia Legislature has given an appropriation of $6,000 to the Industrial Home School for Colored Girls, in Peake, Hanover County, an institution founded and maintained so far by the Virginia State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs. 

Union Hall, the building which the colored Masons and Odd Fellows put up jointly in St. Paul, Minnesota, will be used by nineteen Negro fraternal societies. 

A farewell reception and luncheon were tendered the men of the Twenty-fourth Infantry by both the colored and white residents of Manila, on their departure from the Philippines. 

In Spain it is one of the Three Wise Men, the black king Balthaser, who visits each home and leaves presents for the children at Christmas. 

The simple people of both Poland and Spain worship with love and reference a Virgin Mary called the Black Madonna. 

The Oklahoma State Federation of Negro Women's Clubs, along with other earnest workers, has been successful in persuading the Oklahoma Legislature to establish a school for incorrigible Negro boys.

The colored women's club of Guthrie, Boley and McAlester, Oklahoma support libraries in each of these towns. 

The Woman's Study Club of Clarksburg West Virginia distributes magazines to shut-ins and schools. Last spring it conducted a yard improvement contest which thirty children entered. 

An Ogden auditorium will be erected at Hampton Institute Virginia in memory of the late Robert Ogden. Over two-thirds of $100,000 needed has been subscribed. 

In Spokane, Washington, Sam Glasgow, City Amusement Censor, allowed the play "Birth of a Nation" to be produced. The colored people organized and defeated him for re-election by fifty votes. This is effective censorship.

James. C. Jones of Philadelphia has invented a new mail receiver for railway mail. 

Earnest colored people of Charleston, South Carolina, are making an effort to establish an Industrial Training Home for their young women. It will be named in honor of the late Dr. Mattie V. Lee. 

Numbers of colored men registered for the recent municipal election in
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